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This farm was purchased by my father (Lewis Kramer) in about 1937. He raised primarily small grain (wheat, oats, corn and soybeans).

I spent the first 12 years of my life in the house on the right of the barn. The ranch style house (hidden by trees) on the left was built in 1951-52.

During WWII the barn was a two story chicken coup where chickens were raised by the hundreds. Dressed chickens were sold to hotels in Toledo, Ohio, and eggs were sold from the farm. The road in front of the farm was US Rte 25, at that time a major north/south route. Egg customers from as far away as Detroit would buy eggs by the crate and sell them in their home towns. After the war, the chicken business ended and the farm concentrated on grain.

The property where the buildings were located was sold in 2001. The buildings were demolished and it is now the site of a Home Depot store.

My brother and I continue to own the remainder of the farm and still raise grain on the land.

—Mary Ellen Kramer Pratt
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This is a picture of Pritchett Farms, established in 1875 by Coley Madison Pritchett and his wife Keran Ann Garrison Pritchett.

The classic 2-story white farmhouse is in the foreground. Construction on the house began in 1890 and was finished in 1900. The exterior's wooden siding and all interior floors, doors, molding, fireplace mantles, stairway, etc... are from timber harvested off the land. There are 3 exterior chimneys to the house which are rock/stone collected and stacked by hand from the farm. The back steps are also rock/stone collected and stacked by hand from the farm.

The year is 2010 as I write this - everything is still original on the farmhouse. Large trees - Willow Oak, Red Oak, American Holly, Magnolia, Red Maple - surround the farmhouse. Aside from this, you can see various barns on the property, as well as tobacco and corn being grown in the fields.

Since the beginning, flue-cured tobacco has been the main cash crop. Even in 2010, flue-cured tobacco is still the main cash crop on Pritchett Farms. Several generations have remained on the farm to continue its daily operations - Coley Madison Pritchett, Edgar Wills Pritchett, George Hughey Pritchett, Edgar Hughey Pritchett, Stephanie Anne Pritchett. Pritchett Farms has thrived and survived for 135 years.... Here's to another 135 and many more!! God Bless America!!

—Stephanie Pritchett
 
 

This is a picture of Pritchett Farms, established in 1875.

The farmhouse is slightly hidden by the massive Red Oaks, Willow Oaks, and American Holly surrounding it. The field to the right is planted in corn - a mixture of white and yellow corn to be enjoyed by both the family and the beef cows. The open spaces in the back and to the left are large pastures for the beef cows (and 1 smaller pasture for the pigs/hogs). There are also 2 small chicken houses hidden by the trees (located just to the left of the farmhouse).

Pritchett Farms is a self-sustaining farm... The family receives eggs, poultry, beef, pork, fruit, and vegetables from the animals and crops raised on the farm. It is now 2010 and very few things have changed!!

—Stephanie Pritchett
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This farm is located on Stoudertown Road in Fairfield County, Ohio.

The land covered about 101 acres. The center portion of the house originally sat about 250 meters back from the road, but some time around the 1930s it was moved to the present site. The original house was a one and one-half story frame building. My parent's bedroom and my bedroom were on the top floor. Because the walls were constructed of wood lath and plaster with little or no insulation, it was very cold in my room in the winter, the house being heated by a coal furnace in the dug out basement.

My family moved here in 1952, when I was five years old. My mother's parents also lived with us, as my grandfather was suffering from brain cancer and my father had taken over his Jersey dairy operation. My grandfather passed away later that year, and my grandmother continued to live with us. She and my sister had bedrooms on the first floor. My grandmother and mother were both school teachers and terrific cooks.
In 1968, the center of the house caught fire from an electrical short. The volunteer firefighters saved most of the building, and my father and I, with the help of a couple friends, spent the summer remodeling the house by removing the upper story and modifying the room arrangement.

This photo was taken after my parents had retired from farming and sold all but the land around the buildings. You can see the circular base of what had been a steel silo between the barn and the outbuildings. The low shed behind the main barn was where the Jersey cows were housed. We milked 25-30 cows and sold the milk to the Wetherell Dairy in Pickerington. My sister still lives in this house.

See the tall thin tree by the utility pole near the curve in the lane? I like to say I am the god of that tree. One day as I was mowing the lawn, I noticed a tiny shoot growing in the grass. Ordinarily, I would have just mowed over it, but for some reason, I decided to let it grow. I marked it with a stake and today it a monster size poplar tree.

As I think most farm kids do, I have wonderful memories of growing up on a farm and I would not trade the experience for anything. But I never wanted to be a farmer and so I went off to college, was commissioned as an Army officer, and spent my career in the military. In fact, I still work for the Army today as a contractor.

—Jack Congrove
 
 

Just wanted to let you know that our farm picture arrived safely today. We are very pleased with it. It brought back many memories and cannot wait to show it to the rest of the family. We didn't notice it when we ordered that the neighboring farm is also on the picture. That is an "extra bonus" for us because that farm is the original Leibold farm.

The two Leibold brothers lived on that farm together until my grandfather got married and moved to the farm that we now own. The original farm changed hands a few times through the years. The man who purchased It in 1958 lived there until he passed away about a year and half ago. The farm has recently been sold and the house is being torn down soon. It is awesome that we can see both farms on the picture.
Thank you very much. We will highly recommend you to our friends.

Joe and Cindy Leibold
Farley, IA

—Joe and Cindy Leibold
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Just wanted to let you know that our farm picture arrived safely today. We are very pleased with it. It brought back many memories and cannot wait to show it to the rest of the family. We didn't notice it when we ordered that the neighboring farm is also on the picture. That is an "extra bonus" for us because that farm is the original Leibold farm.

The two Leibold brothers lived on that farm together until my grandfather got married and moved to the farm that we now own. The original farm changed hands a few times through the years. The man who purchased It in 1958 lived there until he passed away about a year and half ago. The farm has recently been sold and the house is being torn down soon. It is awesome that we can see both farms on the picture.
Thank you very much. We will highly recommend you to our friends.

Joe and Cindy Leibold
Farley, IA

—Joe and Cindy Leibold
 
 

We bought this home in 1988 from my husband's grandfather's estate. His grandparents, Ray and Thelma Miller had this house built in 1956. When they lived here, their children were grown and on their own so all they needed was a 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom home. What you can't see behind the trees was an attached garage that we have since turned into another bedroom and bath.

Since we purchased it we completely remodeled it and built a new garage. Some of the trees are gone too. Sadly, we are no longer surrounded by farm land. Nine new homes have been built around us in the last 10 years. It was a wonderful place to raise our children and still is a peaceful place to live.

—MaryAnn Bernath
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This photo was taken in 1975.

These 80 acres were purchased from Clarion Chapman in 2000 by Neal and Royanne Reddy. It shows the new house being constructed south of the old original farmhouse. There was also a new barn on the site of this old barn.

 
 

This photo was taken in 1965.

This was Clarion Chapman's farm north of Seneca IL. His parents owned 320 acres of which Clarion kept 160 and his brother kept 160. These 80 acres were sold to Neal and Royanne Reddy in 2000.

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This place was truely home to me. Just being in the fields with my daddy or in the kitchen with mama, were some of the most wonderful times of my life. I didn't think much about it back then, but now what I would give to just have one of those days back.

Holidays were the warmest times when the family all came together. There was so much love and I have been very blessed to have the raising I had. I would not trade it for anything in the world. It made me for what I am today. With each passing day I remember and am grateful. I say again I am truly blessed...

—Wanda Clark