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This photo from 1980 is of my family's farm. My father, Russell Johnson, farmed the land beginning in 1973. I was born in 1976 and this is where I lived for the first 20 years of my life. You can see the garden where we grew sweet corn and the house which remained relatively unchanged in the years we lived there. My father's Case tractor is also visible, as is the barn for our feeder pigs. There are a few open hog lots visible as well as some fields.

The angle of this picture is facing northwest. To the south and southwest were approximately 150 acres of farmland.

I left home in 1996 for college. My father farmed this land until his death in 2000. In 2007 the farm was sold to two of my dad's brothers who continue to farm the land, keeping the farm in the family.

—Patrick Johnson
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This photo from 1985 is of my family's farm. My father, Russell Johnson, farmed the land beginning in 1973. I was born in 1976 and this is where I lived for the first 20 years of my life. You can see the house which remained relatively unchanged in the years we lived there. A barn and farrowing house for feeder pigs is to the right, as well as hog houses at the top and a large open lot for sows.

The angle of this picture is facing west. To the north were more open lots and some farmland, to the south and southwest were approximately 150 acres of farmland.

I left home in 1996 for college. My father farmed this land until his death in 2000. In 2007 the farm was sold to two of my dad's brothers who continue to farm the land, keeping the farm in the family.

—Patrick Johnson
 
 

This photo is fairly similar to the way the property looked when we purchased it in late 2006. We bought this house off of the Auglaize County Sherriffs auction, as it had been foreclosed on. The house was in pretty sad shape, but we spent the next year completely remodeling and rennovating the property. We added on 12 feet of living space and a 2 car garage. The inside of the house was completely re-drywalled, painted, and 2 full bathrooms were added. We did remove the smaller barn in the picture, but have plans of renovating the larger barn with new roofing and siding. We are just starting our family, and look forward to providing this house with many more stories to tell!

—Sharon Kill
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This farm is one and one half miles east of Oneida, IA and was settled on by a family named Rector. In 1887 Mr. Rector shipped a railroad car load of hogs to Chicago and built the 40' X 100" barn and two years later he shipped another railroad car load of hogs and built the house. The house was torn down in the early 2000's and replaced. My Grandparents, Jesse and Bertha Matthews rented the farm in 1923 and lived there until 1946. My parents, Carl and Clara Fenstermann moved onto the farm in 1939 and helped with the farming. They moved off the farm in 1959 when my sister and her husband, Casey and Ruth Tucker moved here and lived here until 1962. My wife and I, Robert and Mary Fenstermann moved here at that time and moved off in 1964. Our family had rented this farm on a livestock/crop share lease for 41 years.

—Robert Fenstermann
 
 

We purchased an old farmstead in Indiana and the Vintage Aerial staff was very helpful in locating our farm from some 1960's photo reels. We looked all over the place for an old photo and had no idea it could be this easy.

—Adam
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My grandfather became owner of this farm in 1891. I believe it belonged to his father prior to that. My father was born on the farm and lived there until his retirement from farming in 1973, at which time he moved to town and the farm was sold to a neighbor. My father owned this 80-acre farm in addition to another 40 acres a quarter mile east of here. My parents raised 4 daughters on this farm and we attended the same rural one-room school a quarter mile down the road which my father had also attended. We got electricity in 1950 and indoor plumbing a couple of years after that. My parents had pigs, sheep, work horses, chickens and milk cows. My mother always had a big garden and canned our vegetables. My father believed in paying cash for what he needed and got his first loan in 1964 for a new car. The barn was built in 1912 and the house was enlarged in 1916. A portion of the old house was kept on as a summer kitchen. My father replaced and built the hog house, chicken house and grainery in the 1950's. The father belonged to an oats threshing ring with the neighbors however he had his own corn shredder which my son now owns. We daughters had lots of fun in the barn and had a tire swing hanging from the beams as the barn was open in the center to store hay. We three oldest daughters helped with chores and milking cows which we initially did by hand until Dad got a milking machine. It was a very good life and I wouldn't trade the experience for anything.

—Lois Reinhart
 
 

Kind of a long story, but I do love the picture. The reason I had ordered it was for my dads birthday on September 15th. I was very excited and could not wait to show him and talk to him about it, so I gave it to him about 3 weeks ago. He really loved it and I even saw a couple tears in his eyes. He hung it up right away near his front door for everyone to see it. Now for the long part, two weeks ago my dad was in a bad accident and spent 9 days in the hospital before passing away. I know he was really happy about the photo and makes me happy I did not wait for his birthday. I really want to thank you for helping me make my pops happy. The photo will hang there for years to come and a great memory for me. Thank you, Tony

—Tony
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Ed and Cheryl Smith now own the 20 acres the original house in the photo was located. Cheryl’s parents [Orval and Lois (Gottsch) Keyes] rented these 160 acres from Orval’s mom (Mary Keyes), which later became his when Mary passed away. There were nine kids in my family - 7 girls, 2 boys. My brother Dennis was killed in a tractor accident in June 1958 on this farm. My parents bought 80 acres in the 1960's a few miles north of this house and we moved there, but this was the house I always called home. I have heard this farm referred to as the "old Deercup farm". Not sure of that spelling though. They owned it before my Grandma Keyes did. My dad (Orval Keyes) was a farmer and worked as a Licensed Engineer at Allied Chemical by LaPlatte, Nebraska among other places. He then went on to be State Senator for 12 years. My parents left each of us kids 20 acres and six of my siblings, including my husband and I, have built a new house on their 20 acres. My husband and I (Ed Smith) "drew" the 20 acres where the original home was. My three kids (one son, 2 daughters) were born while we lived here. They all have married locally and continue to live in the Springfield area. Ed and I bought a home in Springfield and moved in 1976. This picture was taken in 1982, but I am always looking for a picture dated in the 1960's or 1970's that would show the old barn. It was torn down prior to this picture along with more grain bins.

—Cheryl (Keyes) Smith
 
 

The farm of my grandparents was one of my favorite places to visit. The farm had originally belonged to my grandfather's Uncle Carl. My grandfather inherited it in 1930. My grandfather raised corn, oats, hogs and cattle there. My grandmother raised chickens and collected eggs. There was always something to do and if the work was done you could always take the dog for a walk around the farm. The farm had a lot of hills and so there was always a good view of the farmland from the top of the hills. The trees surrounding the farmhouse provided a windbreak plus a nice refuge for birds and wildlife. The farm now belongs to a cousin.

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This farm is the Pierceson farm on Prophetstown Road. Unfortunately the buildings and home no longer exist. The house was heated with a coal furnace and was built in the late 1800's. We raised Herfeord cattle, and if you look closely you will see hog feeders as well. Overall the Pierceson family farmed 300 acres and have farmed this piece since the 1930's. It was a wonderfull place to ride horses, go exploring, and live the day to day life of the seasonal life of a farmer. We miss it all (except for the coal furnace).

—Steve Burger