Photo 14-OAR-25

1000x

Visitor Comments

Henry & Mae Miller's Farm
Ladner Road,
Easton, Maine

Henry and Mae Miller were my grandparents and I spent lots of time here as a little girl. The little house across the road was where my great-grandmother Miller lived.

This is the house I live in since 1983 and the barn in the back was not here when I moved in.

I was born and raised on this farm! All the buildings look the same except the barn. I married and moved away in 1955.

I lived in this house from the early 70's to '77 or '78. Had great fun with all the neighbor hood kids. Been in Bangor since

I was raised on this farm from the time I was born, 1951 until my Grammie Miller moved out after I got married and had my daughters. I would say in the early 70's I think. Best years of my life!

Many, Many good memories in this house and around the neighborhood! I was nine when we moved to Bangor......ahhh, the stories that house could tell. It is great to see the time line of the house. My parents moved there when I was two weeks old....Summer of 1969 and we moved out in Fall1978.

Henry Miller was the son of Stanley Miller and Harriett "Hattie" Wolverton Miller. Henry's wife was Mae Vita Flewelling, daughter of Roy E Flewelling and Olivia Gray. Roy E Flewelling was the son of Boyd A Flewelling and Hattie Brown.

Dale Hudson, the barn burnt down while we lived there.....mid 1970's. I was talking with someone the other day about the neighborhood kids and families that lived on the loop.....Ferris', Bradleys', Dr. Simms.

I was born in Aunt Haties house in June 1940. The little house bottom right.

Hattie Miller's mother was a sister to George Dane (or Dean). There is a picture of her sitting in front of the old Wolverton house that appears in one of Easton's town reports. My grandmother, Bertha Dane, used to visit with Hattie a lot and they were in the same age bracket, despite the fact that Bertha had been married to Hattie's uncle George. When they married, he was probably 58 and she was 28.

My mother, Helen Dane Todd was related to both the Millers and the Wolvertons because her father was a brother to Hattie Wolverton Miller's mother. His name was George Dean, but he changed the spelling of his last name later because his father remarried and had another son who was also named George Dean. To eliminate mix-ups he called himself Dane instead of Dean. My grandfather George Dane lived in River de Chute along with the Wolvertons and he built the house that Stanley Jordan lives in today. He had one son from his first marriage - George Dean - who attended Colby College and played football there. Unfortunately he caught pneumonia while a senior at Colby and died. After his first wife died, the senior George Dean went to Canterbury, NB. and won the hand of Bertha Nicholson. For his new bride, he built a duplicate of the house in River de Chute on the West Ridge Road in Easton. It was later owned by the Daggett family and currently by Darrell White. He was a long-time tax collector for Easton and used to drive around with his hoorse and buggy, giving out tax bills. Wherever he was a noon-time, he would eat with the family such as the Mahany's in River de Chute with whom he was good friends. He knew the Nicholson family because his brother William Dean had married Annie Nicholson, parents of Murray and Perley Dearn, grandparents of Verna DeLong and Carol Dean Stewart and Perley and Glenn Dean. My mother Helen Todd was a double cousin to Perley and Murray Dean because their fathers were brothers and their mothers were sisters. But she spelled her name "Dane" while the others were "Dean." Relationships can be tricky. Fortunately my mother married Guy Todd whose relatives were all located in the Houlton area. His parents had married and bought a farm on the south end of the West Ridge Road in Easton. They were Methodists. Mother's church had been The Episcopal Church, but since there was none in Easton, she went to both the Methodist and the Baptist Church. One of her high school classmates was the daughter of the Baptist minister. Hence life moves on.

Your Comment

Do you have a connection to this photograph? Maybe you grew up here or know someone who did? What has changed in the 56 years since this photo was taken? Tell us!