Photo 51-SNE-34

051 sne 34

Visitor Comments

I was eight years old when my dad bought this farm in Bloomfield, Ky. It was familiar to me because my dad's cousin and his family lived there before us, and we would visit them. The house sat on top of a hill, and when the wind would blow, there were sounds in that house that would scare a little girl to death. My parents made so many updates to the house, including a furnace. When we moved in, there were stoves in a few of the rooms, and the rest, you just stayed out of because they were cold! But a new roof, paint, wallpaper, new front porch, beautiful antique furniture and many more special touches turned this old house into a thing of beauty. There were two big staircases ... one in the back and a big beautiful circular one in the front, both with banisters great for sliding down. My dad ran a dairy farm here and raised tobacco. He kept the grounds manicured and the fence rows clean. There was an apple orchard out by the barn, and my mom raised a huge garden every summer. Canning and freezing vegetables and fruits kept our summer days filled. Daddy had the tall silo built when we lived there, and there was an in ground silo that he would use. He would cover the sileage with plastic, I think. The little building behind the house is the chicken house. There are two smaller barns behind the dairy barn. They are the corn crib and the little barn where daddy would keep baby calves. The tobacco barn isn't shown in this picture, but it was up the hill from the corn crib. My parents sold the farm in 1980 when daddy could no longer farm it due to being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 1978. The house has since been torn down which I cannot understand. I thought it would have been protected by the Nelson co. Historical society. The last time I was by there, it looked like a subdivision had been built on the land. I believe the dairy barn still stands. This house was built prior to the civil war, and I always wondered what kind of people lived there before I did. This was a happy place for me. I rode my bike all over that farm and across every cow path in the fields. I spent many hours in that dairy barn helping my dad with all the work that went on there. I played in the hayloft and climbed to the top of the silo where I got stung by a wasp. We got snowed in, water pipes froze, and we would see no one for days except the milk man, Mr. Wilbur. It was not an easy life, but my parents were not afraid of hard work, and they made it happen on this old farm.

The demolition or this exquisite house was a genuine loss of history for our community.
(Descendant of multiple previous land owners of this property.)

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